we are young and stupid and raised by wolves

(this is not real life. these are not pictures of me. I am 25 years old and a woman and passionate about politics and fanfiction and, as far as you are concerned, I only exist online.)

 

tumblr should really make you sign a waiver for dashboard whiplash

tumblr should really make you sign a waiver for dashboard whiplash

fotojournalismus:

Mukhta Mollah deftly smooths the red fabric and guides it through a whirling sewing machine. She sews side seams on women’s blouses bound for America. Eight hours a day or longer in this hot and sweaty factory. Six days a week.

On this day, like every workday, she will try to reach a target of 1,000 blouses.

Seamstresses sit all around her in rows that stretch across this factory floor crowded with 350 workers. Fluorescent lights buzz and blink overhead. Enormous fans nosily push around the stagnant air, which carries the familiar scent of new clothes.

It takes Mollah less than 30 seconds to complete her part of the blouse. A helper snips the thread ends and piles the garments into a bin to take to the next station. Mollah has long grown accustomed to the mind-numbing repetition, the unrelenting din, the glare, the heat.

She knows that she won’t get rich; she sends nearly half of her $20-a-week wages home to her family. But she’s grateful that the salary, no matter how small, gave her the means to escape her home village and the fate of her schoolgirl friends.

All of them were married before age 16. All have children of their own. All have moved in with their husbands’ families and must get permission from their mothers-in-law to leave the house.

"For them, it’s a cage," said Mollah, 19. "My life is much better than theirs because they have no freedom. When I go back to my village and see my friends, they ask me, ‘Can you take us with you?’"

Bangladesh’s garment industry has earned a reputation for harsh and sometimes lethal working conditions. An eight-story factory collapsed last April, crushing more than 1,100 workers. Six months earlier, a factory fire killed 112 people who could not flee because their bosses had locked the doors to keep them working.

Despite the horrific industrial accidents and accusations of labor abuses — such as forced workweeks of 80 hours — the picture of the underpaid and over-exploited garment worker gets more complicated when compared with other options available to women in this poor, traditional Muslim society. About 5,600 factories in Bangladesh employ more than 4 million people; 90% of the workers are female.

Read the rest of Pulitzer Center grantee Ken Weiss’s reporting here. 

(via pulitzercenter)

fuchsiagroaning:

Peggy coming home from her job, at which she gets negative points to Gryffindor for trying so damn hard (too damn hard), to an empty apartment, which she had moved to because of her boyfriend who broke up with her last year and which she hates and only stayed at because of him, devoid of any new boyfriend or even a friend or a cat or any company but complaining tenants, and just suddenly sinking down onto her floor and sobbing at how Not What She Wanted her life is

I mean Peggy Olson is as universal as it gets on this show. If you have to relate to a middle class white girl why not Peggy Olson why even bother with Lena Dunham.

gentlemanbones:

emberkeelty:

andthatsterrible:

Everybody knows about the “Forty” entry. Nobody seems to have considered that the other numbers would be just as ridiculous.

Seriously WHY HAVE I NEVER SEEN THIS BEFORE

That is TOO MANY BEES WHEN YOU ARE TINY.

What’s the Forty entry???

gentlemanbones:

emberkeelty:

andthatsterrible:

Everybody knows about the “Forty” entry. Nobody seems to have considered that the other numbers would be just as ridiculous.

Seriously WHY HAVE I NEVER SEEN THIS BEFORE

That is TOO MANY BEES WHEN YOU ARE TINY.

What’s the Forty entry???

I’m just waiting for the day that Peggy Olson wakes up, looks into her wardrobe, and realizes, “You know, I’ve worn enough goddamn plaids in my life” and throws them all out the window

only then will she finally realize her full potential and take over Madison Avenue

humansofnewyork:

These two were acting like complete teenagers. When I walked up, she was nuzzling her head against his shoulder. She giggled the entire time I talked with them, while he kept a big goofy grin on his face. And whenever I asked about their relationship, she clutched his arm, looked at him just like this, giggled, then said: “We’re not telling!”

humansofnewyork:

These two were acting like complete teenagers. When I walked up, she was nuzzling her head against his shoulder. She giggled the entire time I talked with them, while he kept a big goofy grin on his face. And whenever I asked about their relationship, she clutched his arm, looked at him just like this, giggled, then said: “We’re not telling!”

Mad Men is a show that defies easy categorization, because it qualifies for so many: suspense, melodrama, farce, comedy, tragedy. At its core it is existential horror, like Waiting for Godot or reality. There’s nothing as easy as a supernatural component or thematic metaphor to tie it up with a bow. Like real life, Mad Men is littered with false doors and loose threads. There’s no hero’s quest for vengeance, no big crime to be unraveled, no zombies to kill. There are no manipulative plot twists or their cousin, deus ex machina, no easy ways out, and maybe no way out at all. This might frustrate a viewer looking for traditional clues and obvious arcs, but it’s satisfying on a much deeper level. The show’s big mysteries might be subtler, but they are richer, more universal questions. Who are we? What are we doing here? Why do we fall in love or out of it? Why do we grow old and die?

Molly Lambert

(Source: grantland.com)

"Time Zones" could well be one of those "Mad Men" episodes that drives people to complain that nothing happens, but I actually think that the viewers who regularly lobbed that complaint at this drama are gone by now.

We’re down to the core fans now, those who accept that what “happens” on this show has a particular flavor, mood and style. Those “happenings” can consist of a significant look, a weighted silence or a crushing realization. Things often “happen” when the camera is focused on the back of a character’s head. This is a show that loves ambiguities, digressions and oblique angles. Not many shows could pull that off, but “Mad Men” has the kind of cast that makes watching people think and react a real pleasure most of the time.

Maureen Ryan

(Source: The Huffington Post)