we are young and stupid and raised by wolves

(this is not real life. these are not pictures of me. I am 25 years old and a woman and passionate about politics and fanfiction and, as far as you are concerned, I only exist online.)

 

The experiments of Harry Harlow and his associates at the Primate Laboratory of the University of Wisconsin are described in the textbook Principles of General Psychology (1980 John Wiley and Sons)

(Source: life-hack.co.uk)

thedailywhat:

Stats Pr0n of the Day
Ever wonder where all those “missed connections” on Craigslist are happening? Designer Dorothy Gambrell created this infographic for Psychology Today, which shows the most common places where these romantic encounters happen across the United States. Unsurprisingly, it seems as though Californians typically lock eyes in the gym, while New York residents have their love connections on the subway, with quite a few Walmart states in between.

Andrew Sullivan’s right that California and Nevada are self-parodies, and it’s a really sad statement about the South/Walmart…
Also, do note how few women are actually seeking men, in that pie chart in the corner.  Poor unrequited men.

thedailywhat:

Stats Pr0n of the Day

Ever wonder where all those “missed connections” on Craigslist are happening? Designer Dorothy Gambrell created this infographic for Psychology Today, which shows the most common places where these romantic encounters happen across the United States. Unsurprisingly, it seems as though Californians typically lock eyes in the gym, while New York residents have their love connections on the subway, with quite a few Walmart states in between.

Andrew Sullivan’s right that California and Nevada are self-parodies, and it’s a really sad statement about the South/Walmart…

Also, do note how few women are actually seeking men, in that pie chart in the corner.  Poor unrequited men.

Subject for Debate: Are Women People?

A+ article.  Happy International Women’s Day, everyone.

You see, like most women, I was born with the chromosome abnormality known as “XX,” a deviation of the normative “XY” pattern. Symptoms of XX, which affects slightly more than half of the American population, include breasts, ovaries, a uterus, a menstrual cycle, and the potential to bear and nurse children. Now, many would argue even today that the lack of a Y chromosome should not affect my ability to make informed choices about what health care options and lunchtime cat videos are right for me. But others have posited, with increasing volume and intensity, that XX is a disability, even a roadblock on the evolutionary highway. This debate has reached critical mass, and leaves me uncertain of my legal and moral status. Am I a person? An object? A ward of the state? A “prostitute”? (And if I’m the last of these, where do I drop off my W-2?)

In the hopes of clarifying these and other issues, below I’ve recapped recent instances of powerful men from the fields of law, politics and literature tackling the question that has captured America’s imagination: Are Women People?

This honestly doesn’t piss me off. The voting public doesn’t just consist of well-educated students or even English as a first language speakers. Even if he spoke at a 12th grade level, would he have said anything more profound?

Good point about the number of non-native English speakers in this country, and indeed, you certainly don’t have to be educated to vote (and I’m not advocating that - it sounds like something good in theory, bad in practice, and I am definitely for the democracy we have now).

I understand the practicality of the choice to make the SOTU as simple as possible.  It’s good politically, because the biggest purpose of last night’s speech was to get Obama re-elected, so he was appealing to as broad a swathe of voters as possible.  He wanted to make his message as clear and easily understood as possible, and quotable in this age of Twitter and text, etc.  I get that.  

What really bothers me is how this contradicts the lie that is constantly perpetuated by politicians (including by Obama himself on at least one occasion, although I really think the GOP, Romney especially, forced him to it - nevertheless, of course, he’s ultimately responsible in deciding to say it): that this is “the greatest country in the world.”  First thing, we are not by many, many scales of measurement (happiness, health care, income, education, high standard of living for its citizens).  Being the only remaining military superpower (and funny how central that was to Obama’s address last night, our military success and their example to follow) does not make us the greatest, but it does make it likely we are the most arrogant.  Hence, the notion that we are the greatest repeated at such frequency among politicians.  (Although maybe it’s every politician’s job, in every country, to claim that.)

So what infuriates me is the idea that the greatest country needs to talk to its citizens on an eighth-grade level for maximum impact.  I’m offended by the idea that presidents have had, over the last century, to dumb things down for its citizens.

And maybe I’m taking that test too seriously, and maybe it shouldn’t be used to judge the SOTU at all, given the factors of ESL citizens (and even non-citizens who still live here) and the non-privileged.  My post was a pretty emotional response, I admit, just to the premise that that article raised.

But for the second part of your comment, Joy, about whether he would have said anything more profound at a 12th-grade level - I think Obama said exactly what he wanted to say last night, broken down into very simple bits for easier chewing and swallowing.  I left the viewing of it thinking it was a “pretty good” speech, taking into account all the factors that must have driven it, but I am far from 100% satisfied with his proposals or even the writing.  (I admired the narrative carried throughout more than the style of the language - the story, more than the writing, if that makes sense.)  But I have higher expectations for non-election-year SOTUs.

So, to finally get to an answer: I don’t think he would have said anything more profound, but I certainly think he could have.  I think there’s far more you can do with a bigger vocabulary and more complex sentences.  I sincerely miss the best writers of the 19th century, and I wish we could recapture some of their style.  They were really creative with the English language, explored it to its best possible usage, that I don’t see much of today.

And the idealistic part of me whines, what’s WRONG with challenging people, making them look up and learn a new word, though again I know that’s not how it works in reality, people just tune out something they don’t understand.  But I’m a big fangirl of the English language and I like to see it used at full capacity, especially by someone who is supposed to be so intelligent and eloquent and is speaking now as ~leader of the free world~.

I know he didn’t write that speech, by the way.  I know a team did, and they had their reasons for everything, and he of course had some influence and final say, he crossed things out and rewrote lines, but he bowed too to their priorities, to the need of keeping it almost unbearably simple.

What really bothers me is knowing that he could have written something much more eloquent and complex, and he chose not to.  Because it was for the American people.

I’d like to see a 12th-grade level SOTU.  I’d like to see how complex it actually would be.  Maybe I’ll look up Kennedy’s.

After issuing just eight pardons in his first seven years, Barbour pardoned 208 convicts, 41 of them murderers, sex offenders or child molesters, during his last 48 hours in office.

It is headlines like this that really fucks up our Sam’s day.

I generally approve of the concept of pardons, but.  Sex offenders and child molesters.  Who no longer have to have their names on sex offender registries.  And they can all buy guns again!

And this:

One, David Gatlin, who shot and killed his wife while she held their two-month-old child, was denied parole twice in 2010. 

What the fuck, you guys.  I just want to go hide under my bed now.
Oh, and yeah, look who he didn’t pardon:
…Jamie and Gladys Scott. The sisters had no criminal records before receiving double life sentences for allegedly orchestrating an armed robbery with three teenage boys in 1993. The five netted $11 from two muggings. Barbour chose not to pardon them, but he did commute their sentences on the bizarre condition that one sister donate a kidney to the other, who needed a transplant because of diabetes. The sisters, who will remain on parole for the rest of their lives, had asked for full pardons.

For if a man chooses to be promiscuous, he may still aesthetically turn up his nose at promiscuity. He may still demand a woman be faithful to him, to save him from his own lust. But women have lust, too. Why should they be relegated to the position of custodian of emotions, watcher of the infants, feeder of soul, body and pride of man? Being born a woman is my awful tragedy. From the moment I was conceived I was doomed to sprout breasts and ovaries rather than penis and scrotum; to have my whole circle of action, thought and feeling rigidly circumscribed by my inescapable femininity. Yes, my consuming desire to mingle with road crews, sailors and soldiers, bar room regulars — to be a part of a scene, anonymous, listening, recording — all is spoiled by the fact that I am a girl, a female always in danger of assault and battery. My consuming interest in men and their lives is often misconstrued as a desire to seduce them, or as an invitation to intimacy. Yet, God, I want to talk to everybody I can as deeply as I can. I want to be able to sleep in an open field, to travel west, to walk freely at night…

Sylvia Plath, The Unabrided Journals (July 1951)

(Source: aepocrypha)

timemagazine:

Check out the top of Reddit right now and you’ll see a TIME cover focusing on the obesity epidemic in America. It’s a great cover. But it’s not ours. 
It was designed last year as a class assignment by Ricky Linn, a graphic design student at Art Center of College of Design. We hear his professor didn’t like it.
We may not have elbow patches on our blazers, Ricky, but it’s definitely an A to us.

rickylinn:

So this just happened.
NUMBER ONE ON REDDIT.
Good lord I wish I could show this to my instructor now who thought this was failed concept.

timemagazine:

Check out the top of Reddit right now and you’ll see a TIME cover focusing on the obesity epidemic in America. It’s a great cover. But it’s not ours. 

It was designed last year as a class assignment by Ricky Linn, a graphic design student at Art Center of College of Design. We hear his professor didn’t like it.

We may not have elbow patches on our blazers, Ricky, but it’s definitely an A to us.

rickylinn:

So this just happened.

NUMBER ONE ON REDDIT.

Good lord I wish I could show this to my instructor now who thought this was failed concept.